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Sarah’s Travels

Siwash Rock Trail in Stanley Park
By:Sarah in Vancouver
Date: 19 November 2016

The pinnacle on the right of the photo is Siwash Rock, on the south side of Stanley Park. Notice the concrete platform on the cliff to the left, the Siwash Rock Viewpoint. On the platform, a plaque says "Indian legend tells us that this 50 foot high pinnacle of rock stands as an imperishable monument to "Skalsh the Unselfish" who was turned into stone Q'Uas the Transformer as a reward for his unselfishness":




Siwash Rock Trail on Google Maps (click here for link):




On Wikipedia: "About 32 million years ago, a volcanic dike formed in the sedimentary rock that forms the foundation of the park (sandstone and mudstone). Magma was forced to the surface through a fissure in the Earth's crust creating the basalt stack, which is more resistant to erosion than the softer sandstone cliffs. Siwash Rock is the only such sea stack in the Va ncouver area".


Just beside Siwash Rock, at the top of the cliff, is Siwash Rock Trail, a totally quiet and peaceful path that follows the edge of Stanley Park, with beautiful views of Burrard Inlet:







We can also see the ships anchored at English Bay from the Trail:







The trail leads to the Siwash Rock Viewpoint (mentioned above) that was called "Fort Siwash" (an artillery battery) during WWI and II. Views worth the walk:




View of the bicycle path just below, to the right:




and a plunging view of the bicycle path to the left:




Burrard Inlet:




And English Bay:







On the way back, walking down the hill towards the West End, is a very nice field where there is often a dog or two running after a ball. On this photo, the sun rays seem to be waltzing and crisscrossing in the air:




Make whatever you want of the pink spots on the left of this picture (I did not put them there, in any way):




More pink stuff on this picture of the tall trees nearby:




Some of the last nice roses of the season at the Rose Garden:




And a lovely sunflower, too heavy for its stem, just before leaving the Park: